Search found 1246 matches

by Karl K
Sat Jun 16, 2012 8:43 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: More to foetida than meets the eye...
Replies: 9
Views: 782

Re: More to foetida than meets the eye...

The depth of color in yellow roses is due to at least four factors. 1) Type of carotenes produced in the plastids 2) Size of plastids 3) Number of plastids per cell 4) Presence/absence of carotene-cleaving enzyme Carotenes vary from colorless to light yellow to deep yellow (various shades) to orange...
by Karl K
Sat Jun 16, 2012 12:32 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: More to foetida than meets the eye...
Replies: 9
Views: 782

Re: More to foetida than meets the eye...

Simon, Foetida contributes increased carotene production (and more complex forms of carotene) as well as the lack of a carotene-cleaving enzyme that starts the conversion of carotene to perfume. Yellow teas are not so deeply pigmented as Foetida, but they do lack the carotene-cleaving enzyme. An alt...
by Karl K
Sat Jun 16, 2012 11:06 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: More to foetida than meets the eye...
Replies: 9
Views: 782

Re: More to foetida than meets the eye...

Simon, Lammerts (1947) listed 'Tip-Top' and some other Polyantha roses derived from Rosa foetida. The problem, thus far, is that however healthy these varieties may be, they are not the deepest yellows. If we only need Foetida's carotene to enrich to perfume, these Polys would be useful. But to get ...
by Karl K
Sat Jun 16, 2012 10:19 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: To behead or not to behead (first blooms)
Replies: 45
Views: 2962

Re: To behead or not to behead (first blooms)

If you just want a specific plant to get its growth on before letting it bloom, that's fine. Tests on garden peppers, precocious flowering plants, showed that those forced to remain "juvenile" longer, also produced more fruit by the end of the season. Of course, the unmollested plants had the earlie...
by Karl K
Fri Jun 15, 2012 10:51 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Beginner question: lavender plus lavender = yellow???
Replies: 29
Views: 3076

Re: Beginner question: lavender plus lavender = yellow???

I wonder whether a back-cross of 'Sterling Silver' to 'Peace' would give any improvement on vigor while also retaining the color. Le Grice (1968) read a paper on Unusual Colours in Roses that is worth a look. He lists the ancestries of various mauve and tan roses. It's interesting to see how many tr...
by Karl K
Thu Jun 14, 2012 10:01 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Jim... Value adding Hulthemia ;)
Replies: 16
Views: 904

Re: Jim... Value adding Hulthemia ;)

Simon, I agree, up to a point. Too often people try to "correct" earlier reports (however accurate) to bring them into line with a fashionable theory. Some writers have insisted that Tantau's three 'Baby Chateau' x R. roxburghii hybrids really turned up in the F2 generation or a back-cross. They nee...
by Karl K
Thu Jun 14, 2012 9:22 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Schneezwerg
Replies: 16
Views: 1216

Re: Schneezwerg

It is at least possible that the Rosa beggeriana allegedly used was really R. laxa Retzius. As Peter Harris wrote in the current RHA Newsletter, R. laxa Retzius was misidentified as R. beggeriana at Kew at the time Lambert was raising 'Schneezwerg'. If so, then the rebloom is not surprising. Someone...
by Karl K
Thu Jun 14, 2012 8:43 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: More Blue
Replies: 10
Views: 1220

Re: More Blue

Larry, S. R. Gupta, K. S. Pankajamani, and T. R. Seshadri, J. Sci. Ind. Res. B. (India) 16, 154 (1957). [Journal of Scientific & Industrial Research] When I attended K-State in the '70s, I worked part time in the library. I had a great time browsing while I was shelving books. Years later, rememberi...
by Karl K
Wed Jun 13, 2012 2:56 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: More Blue
Replies: 10
Views: 1220

Re: More Blue

Don, The link hasn't been working for me. I did find a cached version (from June 8, 2012), but it didn't show the pictures. I get a message that the server isn't found. Must be a glitch. I'll try again later. Have you used it on yellow roses? I had a copied article (now misplaced) that showed the ye...
by Karl K
Wed Jun 13, 2012 11:16 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: More Blue
Replies: 10
Views: 1220

Re: More Blue

Don, I think that mauve colored roses may come about by different means. Chemistry and Biochemistry of Plant Pigments. Edit. T. W. Goodwin (1976) Chapter 16 - Functions of flavonoids in plants (J. B. Harborne) p 750 Co-pigmentation is also a factor controlling flower colour in the genus Rosa. A blue...
by Karl K
Wed Jun 13, 2012 10:48 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: The quest for BLUE .... BOO !!
Replies: 38
Views: 1955

Re: The quest for BLUE .... BOO !!

George, That only means we can't go out and find a delphinium blue rose to get our start. The fact that some roses do produce myrecitin, a precursor to delphinidin, allows the possibility that delphinidin might turn up if the myrecitin-bearing roses are bred together on a very large scale. Pelargoni...
by Karl K
Wed Jun 13, 2012 10:37 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Grafting HT'son mini rootstock
Replies: 12
Views: 1014

Re: Grafting HT'son mini rootstock

I am interested to learn whether Miniature roses can dwarf other varieties. Has anyone actually succeeded? I'm not overly hopeful, though. Dwarfing isn't always where we might expect it to be. The Gardener's Monthly and Horticultural Advertiser, 10(11): 330-331 (November, 1868) Berckmans: Dwarf Peac...
by Karl K
Wed Jun 13, 2012 10:23 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Jim... Value adding Hulthemia ;)
Replies: 16
Views: 904

Re: Jim... Value adding Hulthemia ;)

Simon, "Survival of the fittest" in a tank is not the same as occurs in the wild. Too many "tank breeders' don't exercise proper selection, leading to bland and listless fish. I read an article, years ago, about the first albino Gardeneri . The specimen and its original descendants were weak and slo...
by Karl K
Wed Jun 13, 2012 10:07 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: More Blue
Replies: 10
Views: 1220

More Blue

Blue roses might be achieved (without gene splicing) in a variety of ways. Some more likely than others. Myricetin, a precursor of delphinidin, is found in some roses. This was reported by Gupta, Pahnajamani and Seshadri in 1957 (Journal of Scientific & Industrial Research). I'm still looking for a ...
by Karl K
Wed Jun 13, 2012 9:08 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Rose Perfume
Replies: 0
Views: 278

Rose Perfume

Several years ago, while I was webmaster for the International Bulb Society, a woman in Spain asked me to find a Spanish source for saffron crocus corms. I tried to find one, but wasn't able to help. However, while searching I found a web site with loads of info on fragrances of all kinds. This is t...
by Karl K
Wed Jun 13, 2012 8:52 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Jim... Value adding Hulthemia ;)
Replies: 16
Views: 904

Re: Jim... Value adding Hulthemia ;)

Simon, There's something about breeding that does not restrict us to one genus, nor to one kingdom. I've also bred bettas, guppies, African killies ( A. gardneri ). I once had a "thing" for Rift Lake cichlids, but only bred some Kribensis . I tried gerbils once, but the female ate the head off the m...
by Karl K
Wed Jun 13, 2012 8:44 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: The quest for BLUE .... BOO !!
Replies: 38
Views: 1955

Re: The quest for BLUE .... BOO !!

The low pH in the vacuole is produced by "proton pump" proteins that move protons (hydrogen ions) into the vacuole. I got that wrong in two ways. First, the pump proteins work to raise the vacuolar pH. Second, more ions than just hydrogen are involved. "The increase of vacuolar pH in the petals dur...
by Karl K
Tue Jun 12, 2012 6:37 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Alain Blanchard
Replies: 79
Views: 5097

Re: Alain Blanchard

George, Gallicas were bred in England and France (and other places), so I doubt too much cold would be required. I'm willing to believe that the folks at the John Innes Institution (England) have a pretty good handle on germination techniques. However, if the weather was warm while the hips were rip...
by Karl K
Tue Jun 12, 2012 1:00 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Alain Blanchard
Replies: 79
Views: 5097

Re: Alain Blanchard

Rowley (1954) studied the problem of germinating seeds of Rosa canina, which often germinate over a period of several years. "By piecing together the findings of these and other experiments it has been possible to formulate a general procedure by which seeds of Rosa canina can be persuaded to skip ...
by Karl K
Tue Jun 12, 2012 12:47 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Brownell Pollen Available
Replies: 6
Views: 508

Re: Brownell Pollen Available

Rosa wichuraiana is not a truly "arctic" rose. It's major fault is cold tolerance ... the willingness to grow at low temperatures. This is not the same thing as cold hardiness or frost resistance. You might be interested in a paper by Risley (1958) in which he compared sprouting of 'Skinner's Rambl...