Search found 1337 matches

by Karl K
Fri Oct 12, 2012 9:56 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Schoener's rose-apple, Schoener's Nutkana
Replies: 26
Views: 2503

Re: Schoener's rose-apple, Schoener's Nutkana

Here's another example of the (sometimes) benefit of grafting before crossing: "From the crossing of the wild potato species Akaule ( Solanum acaule ) Bitter with cultivated varieties hybrids rarely result, and when they do they are of wild appearance and produce hardly any tubers. Such hybrids have...
by Karl K
Thu Oct 11, 2012 12:02 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Schoener's rose-apple, Schoener's Nutkana
Replies: 26
Views: 2503

Re: Schoener's rose-apple, Schoener's Nutkana

[quote=ldavis] There is no doubt that methylation and acetylation of chromosomes is happening all the time to control gene expression. That's how plants know it is winter, or spring. There is also imprinting from the parent during reproduction. And much as we might like to resist it, there is eviden...
by Karl K
Wed Oct 10, 2012 6:32 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Schoener's rose-apple, Schoener's Nutkana
Replies: 26
Views: 2503

Re: Schoener's rose-apple, Schoener's Nutkana

Don, I've read similar reports, so I'm willing to take Schoener at his word. Contrary to the Mendelianist dogma, there is more to heredity than presence/absence of "genes". It is now well established that root stocks can alter gene expression in the scions (and vice versa) and that such alterations ...
by Karl K
Wed Oct 10, 2012 10:18 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Schoener's rose-apple, Schoener's Nutkana
Replies: 26
Views: 2503

Re: Schoener's rose-apple, Schoener's Nutkana

Two things to consider when reading the various reports of Schoener's work (and of other breeders). 1) Journalists can screw up facts without really trying 2) What was believed to be absolutely true in the 19th century often turned out to be wrong. I have a bibliography of articles by and about Scho...
by Karl K
Tue Oct 09, 2012 11:50 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Schoener's rose-apple, Schoener's Nutkana
Replies: 26
Views: 2503

Schoener's rose-apple, Schoener's Nutkana

I have speculated that the Caninae species (irregular polyploids) would be promising parents for intergeneric hybrids. Chromosome remodeling is a frequent component of adaptation and speciation. Polyploid roses are mostly differential (or allo-) polyploids, meaning that the chromosomes of the parent...
by Karl K
Thu Sep 13, 2012 9:57 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Diploidy or not diploidy. That is the question...
Replies: 63
Views: 8137

Re: Diploidy or not diploidy. That is the question...

[quote=Don] >> The polyploid species are allopolyploids, combining chromosomes of two or more distinct diploid species. You stopped me cold here, Karl. Can you tell me why you say this?[/quote] Here's another, perhaps more persuasive argument from Ake Gustafsson, Differential Polyploidy within the B...
by Karl K
Thu Sep 13, 2012 9:41 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Rubus/rosa hybrid of Joseph Tychonievich
Replies: 26
Views: 3129

Re: Rubus/rosa hybrid of Joseph Tychonievich

I know a successful hybrid was reported by I believe it was Burbank between a rose and a strawberry but the resulting plants were a dead end. I don't recall that cross. He did cross a rose and an apple (not satisfactory), and raspberry x strawberry . This was also a dead end, but pretty darned fasc...
by Karl K
Thu Sep 13, 2012 9:23 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Harvest ripeness question
Replies: 16
Views: 1140

Re: Harvest ripeness question

Van Mons (1835) collected unripe pears and let them rot (or "ferment") before planting the seeds. Peter Gideon (1899) , father of the Minnesota apples, planted apple cores or pomace from the cider presses an inch deep. No cleaning at all. Finally, John Cook (1905) on roses: "When the stem of the hi...
by Karl K
Wed Sep 12, 2012 10:07 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: scientific literature reading
Replies: 3
Views: 629

Re: scientific literature reading

Henry, Once I find the title of an article, I search for it again on Google Books and on the internet at large. Just put quotation marks around the title. Google Books may show only snippet views of the desired publication, but by searching for text within it is sometimes possible to get more of the...
by Karl K
Tue Sep 11, 2012 1:23 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Rubus/rosa hybrid of Joseph Tychonievich
Replies: 26
Views: 3129

Re: Rubus/rosa hybrid of Joseph Tychonievich

Burbank also crossed rose and apple, but nothing useful came of it. Schoener seems to have been a little more successful than Burbank and Shepherd. Illustrated World 25: 481-482 (1916) AN INVENTOR OF ROSES RANDALL R. HOWARD "A freakish development is his rose-apple—a Spitzenburg apple crossed with...
by Karl K
Tue Sep 11, 2012 10:59 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Rubus/rosa hybrid of Joseph Tychonievich
Replies: 26
Views: 3129

Re: Rubus/rosa hybrid of Joseph Tychonievich

Both sections of the genus Rubus (blackberries and raspberries) naturaly possess stipules very similar to Rosa , though somewhat less foliose (more linear and subulate), so that character wouldn't necessarily be evidence of Rosa parenthood. This is a possible hybrid combination I have been interest...
by Karl K
Mon Sep 10, 2012 10:11 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Rubus/rosa hybrid of Joseph Tychonievich
Replies: 26
Views: 3129

Re: Rubus/rosa hybrid of Joseph Tychonievich

I read on the Garden Forum that the plants looked almost exactly like Rubus odoratus, but new growth was tinged red, and the leaves had stipules - both of these traits being derived from the Rosa pollen parent(s).

I'd sure like to know more about them.
by Karl K
Wed Sep 05, 2012 3:43 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Ploidy of a self-pollinated triploid
Replies: 6
Views: 521

Re: Ploidy of a self-pollinated triploid

Rob, There is much variation between different triploids. Wulff (1959) discussed a few cases. A lot depends on the types of chromosomes that are present. If all three sets come from a single species, or from two closely allied species, the chromosomes are likely to get tangled up in trivalents, alon...
by Karl K
Wed Sep 05, 2012 3:32 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Diploidy or not diploidy. That is the question...
Replies: 63
Views: 8137

Re: Diploidy or not diploidy. That is the question...

There are many factors that can influence fertility. Years ago, possibly on Chez Vibert, someone commented that Rugosas refuse to fruit in the "fog belt" of northern California. And Linnaeus observed that many alpine plants become sterile when brought down to sea level. Hibiscus breeders struggled w...
by Karl K
Tue Sep 04, 2012 9:48 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Diploidy or not diploidy. That is the question...
Replies: 63
Views: 8137

Re: Diploidy or not diploidy. That is the question...

[quote=SimonV] Every time I mention species roses that are meant to have little or no self-fertility, based on the published work of others, someone mentions one they know of that is... [/quote] Simon, That's the truth. We really need more information on the natural history of roses, such as preferr...
by Karl K
Thu Aug 23, 2012 10:19 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Diploidy or not diploidy. That is the question...
Replies: 63
Views: 8137

Re: Diploidy or not diploidy. That is the question...

Don, Polyploid varieties (or autopolyploids) gain no apparent advantage over the original. They are commonly larger, and maybe later in flowering and ripening fruit, but otherwise they gain little. Furthermore, an autotetraploid from a diploid parent tends to have reduced fertility due to tri- and q...
by Karl K
Wed Aug 22, 2012 9:44 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: David Z... what does this mean?
Replies: 7
Views: 657

Re: David Z... what does this mean?

[quote=SimonV] It was very timely as my caffiene treated laevigata will hopefully bloom in about a month and I've decided to test for doubling this way instead of by root-tip squash incase I got incomplete doubling[/quote] Simon, I'm surprised that you are trying caffeine to double the chromosome nu...
by Karl K
Wed Aug 22, 2012 9:35 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Diploidy or not diploidy. That is the question...
Replies: 63
Views: 8137

Re: Diploidy or not diploidy. That is the question...

Don, A phylogenetic tree based on nuclear DNA is likely to give very different results than one based on chloroplast DNA. Both are informative, but in different ways. For example, we may assume that 'Basye's Amphidiploid' inherited the cDNA of its seed parent, but nuclear DNA from both. Therefore it...
by Karl K
Tue Aug 21, 2012 2:49 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Diploidy or not diploidy. That is the question...
Replies: 63
Views: 8137

Re: Diploidy or not diploidy. That is the question...

[quote=Warren] I am not sure who it was, but there is this chaps therory that all roses evolved from a single artic decaploid rose dropping ploidy numbers as they interbred, and then there is the other therory, that ploidy numbers increased as they interbred. Its all sort of like the Astro Physicist...
by Karl K
Sun Aug 12, 2012 7:36 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: How important is a warm stratification period?
Replies: 10
Views: 884

Re: How important is a warm stratification period?

According to Buist (1838) , a period of rest (or warm after-ripening?) can improve the germination and growth of Tea roses grown from seed. [center]Magazine of Horticulture 4: 247-248 (July 1838) Art. III. Experiments on the Vegetation of Rose Seeds. By R. Buist, Florist, &c, Philadelphia.[/center] ...