Search found 1309 matches

by Karl K
Tue Jul 10, 2012 11:20 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: What worked, what didn't...
Replies: 35
Views: 3072

Re: What worked, what didn't...

A brush that has been used more than once is little better than a lottery chance for experiments." what exactly is that supposed to mean? George, A "lottery chance" is slim to none. I just thought it was a clever way of saying that brushes are unreliable, if you're really concerned about parentage....
by Karl K
Tue Jul 10, 2012 10:49 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Hybrid roxburghii
Replies: 5
Views: 775

Re: Hybrid roxburghii

I once pollinated the very double form of Roxburhgii by 'Doorenbos Selection', but I got so excited when a hip formed that I cut it open to see if there were any seeds. There were!

At the time I didn't know that unripe seeds sometimes may germinate. Assuming the seeds were viable.
by Karl K
Tue Jul 10, 2012 10:45 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Rose Seedling Fact Question
Replies: 28
Views: 2465

Re: Rose Seedling Fact Question

[quote=ldavis] You can bet that Pernet-Ducher didn't toss over 99% of his seedlings. In fact looking at Soliel d'Or I'd say it was maybe not even 9/10. And you know that Knock Out came from a relatively small, carefully selected population. But when trying to get something for a AARS winner building...
by Karl K
Tue Jul 10, 2012 5:28 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Do you find it offensive for others to breed with YOUR roses
Replies: 46
Views: 3021

Re: Do you find it offensive for others to breed with YOUR r

I don't understand how anyone could be offended when a variety that is in commerce is used for breeding. Certainly professional breeders use varieties created by other breeders, while also developing their own breeding stock. And, like Ralph Moore, they are happy to give credit where credit is due. ...
by Karl K
Tue Jul 10, 2012 3:05 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: What worked, what didn't...
Replies: 35
Views: 3072

Re: What worked, what didn't...

When I started pollinating roses and other plants, I wanted to do it right and bought some brushes. Now I don't bother with them. I particularly enjoy Donald Beaton's comment in his article on Hybridization in the Magazine of Botany 16: 13-14 (1849) : "It is only necessary to be most scrupulous abou...
by Karl K
Tue Jul 10, 2012 2:48 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Rose Seedling Fact Question
Replies: 28
Views: 2465

Re: Rose Seedling Fact Question

The American Rose, p. 32-33 (1969) Roses of Health and Vigor - My First Aim Sam McGredy, Northern Ireland "We begin by budding five of any variety that has looked promising in the greenhouse; from up to 150,000 seedlings germinated inside, we may bud some three or four thousand different varieties i...
by Karl K
Tue Jul 10, 2012 2:36 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: 'Russelliana's parts!
Replies: 14
Views: 824

Re: 'Russelliana's parts!

Stout (1922) observed similar proliferations in Brassicas. "In a few plants of several strains of both Brassica chinensis and B. pekinensis , noticeable axial proliferations develop. The axis anlage inclosed within the carpels of the pistil grows and branches until it bursts open the pistil. The pe...
by Karl K
Tue Jul 10, 2012 2:27 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Stress and Crossing
Replies: 6
Views: 422

Re: Stress and Crossing

Philip, Some generalities are useful, others not so much. I agree that data from more closely allied species would be useful. Here's one that is not precisely on point: African Journal of Agricultural Research Vol. 5(25), pp. 3581-3589, December 2010 Special Review Unfruitfulness in fruit crops: Cau...
by Karl K
Tue Jul 10, 2012 1:18 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Stress and Crossing
Replies: 6
Views: 422

Re: Stress and Crossing

Philip, You may be right about the weary momma. And Michurin found that plants flowering for the first time tend to be more tolerant of foreign pollen (Foolish virgins?). First flowers of a seedling may be somewhat defective. This defectiveness may extend to incompatibility. This seems to fit the mo...
by Karl K
Tue Jul 10, 2012 11:01 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Stress and Crossing
Replies: 6
Views: 422

Stress and Crossing

Seed parents that are suffering from environmental stress may be more willing to accept foreign pollen than they would when thriving. Also, pollen from non-stressed plants tends to be more successful in siring offspring than pollen from the same plant (or type of plant) when stressed. Science 248(49...
by Karl K
Thu Jun 28, 2012 8:09 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Breeding Species by J. H. Nicolas
Replies: 17
Views: 2166

Re: Breeding Species by J. H. Nicolas

Another approach to "breaking" a species is to use a specimen with a mutant defect, such as a white-flowered variety of a species that normally has colored flowers. Van Fleet (1916) wrote, "I have raised some very attractive yellow and coppery flowered crosses of Harrison with rugosa alba, but only ...
by Karl K
Thu Jun 28, 2012 9:39 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Dead End Blotch?
Replies: 57
Views: 3127

Re: Dead End Blotch?

I just found a paper that may be of interest: Genetic and biochemical characterization of a "lost" unstable flower color phenotype in interspecific crosses of Nicotiana "The earliest studies on the genetics of N. langsdorffii and N. sanderae allowed an identification of the several genes involved in...
by Karl K
Wed Jun 27, 2012 2:01 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Breeding Species by J. H. Nicolas
Replies: 17
Views: 2166

Re: Breeding Species by J. H. Nicolas

Kim, This is a very interesting article, especially the part about using species as pollen parents rather than seed parents. When possible. It is also worth noting that two of the earliest scientists to study hybrids, Gaertner and Wichura, found that in combining three species, more variations would...
by Karl K
Wed Jun 27, 2012 8:40 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Something different... followed by disappointment :( Rosa la
Replies: 30
Views: 3611

Re: Something different... followed by disappointment :( Ros

Apparently the Cherokee did sometimes make hips back in the early 19th century. American Farmer 3(15): 120 (July 6, 1821) CHEROKEE ROSE Columbia, (S. C.) June 5th, 1821 John S. Skinner, esq. DEAR SIR—On looking yesterday over the second volume of your very useful paper, the "American Farmer," whic...
by Karl K
Tue Jun 26, 2012 12:47 pm
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: HMF
Replies: 41
Views: 4068

Re: HMF

I haven't raised seedlings from 'Mister Lincoln', but I'm still surprised that it does not produce strong offspring. It's siblings, 'Papa Meilland' and 'Oklahoma' are also strong growing. Could their strength be merely hybrid vigor? It would be interesting to see if the cross Chrysler Imperial x Cha...
by Karl K
Tue Jun 26, 2012 11:11 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Sports, Chimeras and Tissue Culture
Replies: 2
Views: 266

Re: Sports, Chimeras and Tissue Culture

Joan, I had a similar idea before I left California. I noted that Austin had used 'Iceberg' in breeding some of his roses, and thought that 'Burgundy Iceberg' crossed with 'Indigo' might give me a darker colored "English" rose. I didn't get around to making the cross, but I guess it would have been ...
by Karl K
Tue Jun 26, 2012 10:03 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Dead End Blotch?
Replies: 57
Views: 3127

Re: Dead End Blotch?

Simon, Sometimes stripes and other types of variegation are due to transposons (jumping genes). The cell may or may not recognize the transposon, and silence it -- along with whatever other genes might be located near it. The "Black Mexican" sweet corn is an example. The strain normally bears unifor...
by Karl K
Tue Jun 26, 2012 8:50 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: HMF
Replies: 41
Views: 4068

Re: HMF

Neil, I'm not sure I understand what you mean. If a dominant trait is present in the seed parent, then there is the possibility that the seed parent also carries the corresponding recessive. Which characteristic of 'Mister Lincoln' makes you think it has not been seed parent to so many alleged offsp...
by Karl K
Tue Jun 26, 2012 8:47 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Dead End Blotch?
Replies: 57
Views: 3127

Re: Dead End Blotch?

Larry and Simon, Zen's results are puzzling. The possibility that mutations trapped in inner cell layers may be revealed in under-developed axial buds has some merit. The Southern Cultivator's comment, "...that the results of experiments differ in the case of different Roses" seems to support this p...
by Karl K
Mon Jun 25, 2012 11:24 am
Forum: Rose Hybridizers Association Forum
Topic: Dead End Blotch?
Replies: 57
Views: 3127

Re: Dead End Blotch?

[quote=ldavis] I see that Art Nouveau is not a stripe in the usual sense, (ramdom breaks in pigment expression), but a developmental segmentation mutant. Looks like petaloids with the dimple in the outer edge and the yellow streak going to the base. This certainly could give some cool effects.[/quot...